Monthly Archives: March 2018

Race Pace and Your Long Run

Training for a race is big commitment.  There are lots of miles and hours spent getting ready for the event and most of those miles are not spent at goal race pace.  Why not?  It’s too hard on your body to stay at race pace all the time.  Finding the balance between hard workouts and slower ones is important.  In fact, the majority of elite runners’ miles are spent at paces slower than their goal speed.  race pace

But you have to run fast to run fast!  Yes, and while any good training plan includes specific tempo workouts sometimes it’s nice to mix things up.  Luckily, your long run is a great place to add some faster miles.  Adding race pace running to your long run is a challenge that will get you both physically and mentally ready for a race day effort.  As your body adapts to spending time at goal pace, it’ll get easier.  It also provides a good chance to practice your fueling strategy.

One of Team ECRP‘s favorite long run with race pace miles workouts is the 3-2-1.  It can also be lengthened for marathon training to a 5-4-3-2-1 effort.  Run at least a mile warm-up then a mile easy between each section of race pace work.  The cool down is up to you.  This workout has you spending plenty of time getting comfortable at your goal pace without shredding your legs for the rest of the week.

A second option is to do a fast finish run.  Take the first two thirds of your run at normal long run pace then finish fast.  That can be at goal race pace or gradually faster all the way to the end.  Examples include a 20 miler with 10 miles at long run pace, 8 miles at race pace and a 2 mile cool down.  For a half marathon try a 13 miler with 8 miles at long run pace then 5 miles of getting 5-10 seconds faster per mile.

By breaking faster miles into sections you’ll be able to spend more time at goal pace with less wear and tear.  It will bring variety to the long run and help those workouts fly by.  Be careful not to include them too often, however.  These are challenging workouts and you’ll need time to recover.

Coach Meredith

Running 101: Marathon Recovery

Running a marathon is hard.  Racing one is even harder.  No matter how fast you cross the finish line your body will hurt, your mind will be tired and emotions will still be running high.  After your collect that medal and celebrate with all the carbs of any kind, it’s time to start letting your body heal.  How fast and how well you treat your beat up muscles post race makes a huge marathon recoverydifference in how quickly you can get back to your regular routine.  Use these tips for high quality marathon recovery and you’ll be back on track in no time.

Keep moving.  One of the most important aspects of marathon recovery is movement.  This doesn’t mean a tough track workout two days later or taking off for another race.  Giving muscles some easy work to do the day after racing has been shown to speed recovery but it has to be just that, easy.  A slow jog, air squats, a few push-ups and 30 minutes of yoga works wonders.  Your goal should be to keep blood, nutrition and oxygen pumping to damaged muscles without any added stress.

Mobilize.  Just getting out there are easy jogging a mile or two won’t get the job done.  You need to work tired and abused joints through a full range of motion to keep fluids moving around.  This is how you make sure muscles, tendons, ligaments and bones get the blood, oxygen and nutrients they need to repair while clearing out the debris from when they got damaged.  Foam rollers, bands, softballs and a lacrosse ball are all part of a well built marathon recovery kit.  A professional sports massage is also always a good idea.

Eat up.  You definitely burned a ton of calories covering all of those miles.  Replacing them and giving your body the nutrients it needs to repair damaged muscles is paramount.  Replenish fluids with sports drinks or salted water as soon as you cross the finish line.  When your tummy is ready, chow down on calorie loaded foods like bananas and yogurt.  After chilling out, putting your feet up for a bit and processing those foods, it’s time to head for pizza and tacos.marathon recovery

Sleep.  Getting an adequate amount of sleep will help you recover faster than just about anything else.  After the excitement of finishing and celebrating it can be tough to shut down.  When you get home try taking a warm bath, meditating and turning off all electronic devices.  Here’s a great piece on how a solid night’s shut eye can make a big difference in your marathon recovery.

Go easy on the celebration.  Yes, those free beers taste delicious but they’re just going to cause more trouble for your already hostile body.  Dehydrated muscles aren’t aching to lose more water.  Drink a bottle of water or sports drink before anything alcoholic then make sure you mix in plenty of other fluids with those post race cocktails.  A long walk or standing around for a little bit won’t do any harm but staying for the entire post race convert might.  You want to get off your feet for a few hours as soon as you can to start the healing process.

Freeze.  Cryotherapy and ice baths are wonderful tools to jump start marathon recovery.  Part of many runners’ regular plan cold therapies are effective and simple.  Lowering your temperature flushes waste from muscles, reducing swelling and lets them get down to business right away.  Have an ocean or lake near by?  Celebrate by jumping in!

Coach Meredith