Tag Archives: injuries

Running Injuries: Why Did That Happen?

Runners get hurt all the time.  Whether it’s from doing too much without a day off, slipping on a rocky trail run or simply stubbing a toe, getting hurt happens.  Running injuries are more than common and bouncing back from one can be as simple as ice and elevation or as complicated as surgery and physical therapy.  In truth, however, they’re quite often very preventable.

Were you tackled in a football game?  That’s easy to source.  Do you have daily low back pain and discomfort?  Maybe your hamstrings are tight or weak.  Are you having knee pain because you over running injuriesstride while you run?  Foot pain from weak glutes?  Finding the source isn’t always easy but it’s always necessary.

That’s because simply taking time off until your injured body feels better isn’t the answer.  Without understanding where your injury came from you’re likely to go out and sooner or later go through the same thing again.  So what’s the solution?  Find and treat the source (poor mobility, bad form), not the symptom (pain, strained muscle).  Examples include foot problems from a lack of glute strength or knee pain from over striding.  The location of your injury isn’t where it presents because your body compensates to continue functioning.  These compensations can end up causing something even more serious.

To get to the root, ask yourself these questions:

What was I doing?
Are my movement patterns correct?
Do I have adequate mobility to perform these movements safely?
Am I using the correct equipment?
Do I take care of my body before and after a workout properly?
Am I over training?

Answering these questions will probably mean getting help from a coach, doctor or teacher who has the knowledge to guide you.  Get to the root cause, upstream or down, of your problem and kiss (most of) those running injuries goodbye.

Coach Meredith

The Every Runner Foot Care Plan

Having two healthy feet is something most runners take for granted.  Until one gets injured.  Foot care is often overlooked by runners who stretch hamstrings, quads and calves but miss their most important part.  Feet take the first impact of every step.  They also help us stay upright, balance and learn about our environments.  Here are some of Team ECRP‘s favorite ways to keep them healthy and happy.

Find the right shoes.  If your shoes are too loose they can rub and causing blisters.  Too narrow and you’re susceptible to callouses, too.  If they’re too small, add in the risk of black or foot carefalling off toenails.  When you buy running shoes, do so from a reputable running store and make sure the fit is correct.  And, once you have the correct shoes, know when it’s time for new ones.

Socks.  There are tons of socks out there, and you want to be sure you’re running in the right ones.  Cotton socks can lead to blisters while other materials, such as acrylic, can help protect your feet from rubbing by pulling sweat and moisture away.  You might need to vary your sock choice based on the weather, a light sock won’t be equally fit for a speed workout and racing a marathon.  Although there are lots of choices, socks are fairly inexpensive, so try different brands, fabrics and cuts until you find what works best.

Keep your feet dry.  This can be hard if you’re running in the rain, on the trails, in snow or on the beach.  Waterproof trail shoes are a great choice for those who brave nature, but for those who run mostly on pavement or a treadmill, the answer is usually to wear moisture wicking fabrics.  Never start with damp or wet socks and shoes and keep an extra pair nearby for when you’re finished.

Massage your feet by rolling them on golf or lacrosse balls, a rolling pin or foot roller.  Not only will a foot massage relax those hard working muscles, it’ll give you a few minutes to chill out foot careand take a break.  Be careful, though.  Rolling or massaging your feet too hard can cause damage to tender fascia and harm, rather than help, this important body part.

Make them strong.  Do foot and ankle strengthening exercises.  Weak feet mean you lose out on power and speed while increasing your risk of injury.  Try being barefoot as much as you can.  Shoes support muscles so they don’t have to work.  Taking off your shoes will strengthen the arch of your foot while aiding in your body’s ability to sense what’s happening around it.

Use these tips to keep your feet in good working condition and they’ll help you hit a new PR.

Coach Meredith

The Benefits of Fatigue

Fatigue can be a nasty word.  Like anything else, too much is definitely not a good thing.  Excessive fatigue can lead to over training, stress fractures, mental burnout and loads of other injuries.  An appropriate dose of accumulated fatigue, however, is the prescription for a good training plan.

Most important among those things is adaption.  No workout happens by itself.  It’s surrounded by other workouts, life events, nutrition and sleep.  It’s the build up of stress on muscles and depleted energy stores that make training work.  Our bodies adapt to these tired or less than 100% states and get stronger.  In fact, it can take up to 14 days to recover from a hard fatigueworkout.  But you’ll keep running.  Easy running is incredibly important to help torn up muscle fibers repair.  It keeps our bodies working without adding so much stress we start to break down.

We can also take advantage of accumulated fatigue when preparing for a race.  Since you’re probably not going run 26.2 miles during training, use the previous day’s workout to help make 20 miles feel like 26.  Running a steady state six to eight miler the day before your long run means you’re starting that run with six miles under your belt.  It’s like starting at Mile 6 instead of the start line and both our bodies and brains benefit.

The mental toughness garnered from a pair of fatigue inducing workouts like that is a great tool for race day.  We gain confidence with each tough workout we power through.  Every run that’s one mile longer or 1% tougher tells our brain ‘hey, we can do this’.  Once we’ve broken that ‘I can do it’ barrier enough, it goes away.  We become familiar with the tiredness we’ll experience at the end of a long race and learn to push through it.

Now, let’s not forget to relax.  We all need a down week every four to six weeks.  It gives us a chance to heal significantly before going back to hard training.  That’s also the goal of tapering.  Get rid of all that accumulated training fatigue.  Allow your body to make the final adjustments it can so you are in peak performance shape on race day.  Fill up your fuel tank, let your muscles get as strong as they can and give your brain a breather.

Use accumulated fatigue to your advantage and reap the benefits on race day.

Coach Meredith

Solutions for Shin Splints

Shin splints are an annoying injury that almost every runner faces at some point during their career.  Whether you’re a 2:45 marathoner or 45 minute 5k racer, it’s one problem no one wants to face.  Identified by throbbing shin bones when running, shin splints are a painful and hobbling nuisance.  Luckily, once you’ve ruled out a stress fracture, the solution can oftentimes be a simple and easy one.  Here are three simple fixes for shin splints that Team ECRP uses over and over again to keep runners moving.

Test your shoelaces.  Sometimes the quickest way to get to the root shin splintsof your shin pain is to check the things on your feet.  Connected to your ankle and therefore your shin bone, anything awry with your foot can lead to serious problems anywhere above it.  How?  Our feet shin splintsflex to absorb impact every time we land, they move around to help us balance and are how power goes from our bodies to the ground.  If our shoes are tied too tightly we take that away from them.

Fix:  Make sure you can fit at least a finger under all of your laces except the top one.  Try different lacing styles based on your foot type.  Kicking those shin splints could be as simple as letting your feet do their jobs.

Gait Analysis: OK, it’s not the laces.  You tried loosening them and nothing changed.  The next step is to have your gait checked out.  Serious heel striking or over striding with a locked out ankle can send shock waves right up those fragile shin bones every single step.  Have a qualified coach watch to help determine if the way you run could be causing yourshin splints problem.

Fix:  Work towards shorter, softer steps.  Not all heel striking is bad but all over striding is sure to cause some trouble.  Film yourself and work with a coach to treat the source, not just the symptom.

Strength Training:  Since we always want to treat the source of an injury so it doesn’t happen again that gait analysis mentioned above is a key component of healing your hurting shins.  Weak hips or poor posture can lead to lots of problems below the knee.  Proper strength training will help prevent the overuse that typically leads to torn up shin muscles.

Fix:  Work with a coach or trainer to develop a plan that includes runner specific strength work and a gradual build up of mileage.

A completely avoidable injury, shin splints won’t sideline you again when you use these tips.

Coach Meredith

Understanding Your Injury Matters

Injuries happen all the time.  Athletes of all levels and even those who aren’t athletes can experience an injury.  Recovery can be as simple as a little ice or heat and elevation.  It can also understanding your injurybe as complicated as surgery and take months.  The key to recovering is understanding your injury and preventing it from happening again.

Were you tackled in a football game?  That’s easy to source.  Do you have daily low back pain and discomfort?  Maybe your hamstrings are tight, maybe it’s something else.  Are you having knee pain because you’re heel striking while you run?  Are your knees falling in when you squat under weight?  Lots of day to day and chronic injuries are not so easy to pin down but discovering what caused the problem is the best possible thing you can do to move forward.

Unfortunately just taking time off until your injured body feels better isn’t the answer.  Without understanding your injury you’re likely to go out and sooner or later go through the same thing again.  So understanding your injurywhat’s the solution?  Treat the problem (poor mobility, bad form), not the symptom (pain, strained muscle).  Ask yourself these questions when you get hurt to get to the bottom of what went wrong:

What was I doing?
Are my movement patterns correct?
Do I have adequate mobility to perform these movements safely?
Am I using the correct equipment?
Do I take care of my body before and after a workout properly?
Am I over training?

If you can’t answer these questions or answer them satisfactorily, get help from a trainer, doctor or teacher who will guide you in the right direction.  Stripping your activity down to the bare minimum will highlight the root of what caused your injury and help you avoid it in the future.

Coach Meredith