Tag Archives: running strength

Strong Hips for Runners: 3 Exercises

Runners need strong hips.  They’re the driving force behind every stride you take and the better they are able to perform the faster you’ll cover ground.  Tight hip flexors and weak glutes are common and contribute to a myriad of injuries from IT Band syndrome to runner’s knee.  Strengthening your hips and glutes helps prevent injuries while improving running form and increasing speed.  Here are four of Team ECRP‘s favorite hip power building exercises.

Fire Hydrant.  This simple body weight exercise is a winner for working the hip abductors.  Start with your hands and knees on the ground in an all fours position then lift your leg away from your midline.  Be sure to keep your hips still while focusing on the activation of hip and glute strong hipsmuscles.  Pause at the top then repeat for your desired number of reps and sets.

Clam Shells.  Another uncomplicated exercise, clam shells also work the hip abductors.  You can step the difficulty up by adding a resistance band above your knees but that’s not necessary to get the benefits.  Begin lying on your side with a neutral spine.  Bend your knees to 90 strong hipsdegrees and hips to 45 with your top leg stacked directly on your bottom one.  Keeping your feet together raise your top knee away from the bottom one (abducting your hip).  Pause at the top then repeat for your target number of reps and sets.

Seated Band Hip Abduction.  Use this move to earn strong hips anstrong hipsd glutes.  Begin sitting on a bench or chair with a flat back and feet flat on the floor shoulder width apart.  Place a resistance band around your legs above the knees.  Grip the front of the bench with both hands and maintain good posture while you pull your knees apart.  Do not let your knees cave in after you pause and return to the starting position for your goal reps and sets.

Strong hips are important and using these three exercises will help you earn them.

Coach Meredith

Unilateral Movement for Runners

Unilateral movement can sound intimidating.  Thankfully, however, the movements themselves aren’t.  Any runner can and will benefit from practicing using one side of their body at a time.  When we use both legs to complete a squat or jump, the stronger side often takes over while the weaker side stays that way.  This can be a recipe for a funky gait, less running power, muscle imbalances and even injuries.  Unilateral training works to make weak sides stronger, increase muscle recruitment, eliminate muscle imbalances and strengthen the core as a bonus.

Team ECRP loves unilateral movement and here are three of our favorites.  Each one will help you get stronger and run with better form.  These movements work the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, ankles, feet and abs all on their own.  If you’re looking to hit your upper body too, safely add carried or overhead weights.unilateral movement

Lunges.  Take a giant step forward with one leg then drop your back knee down towards the ground.  Be sure to keep the front knee behind to your toe, aiming for a 90 degree angle.  Once that back knee hits the ground, push back up to standing position and bring your feet back together.  Repeat on both sides.

Step-upsUsing a box, chair or table that’s strong enough to hold you and a comfortable height, place one foot fully onto the flat raised surface.  Use your front leg to lift your body upunilateral movement, bringing your back foot onto the box as well.

Single Leg Deadlifts.  Single leg deadlifts require lots of balance and hamstring mobility.  Start by standing feet together then raise one leg straight behind you while your shoulder come forward as a counter balance.  Keep your working leg steady but don’t lock out your knee as you keep your non-working hip open and back flat.  Touch the ground then slowly return to the starting position.

Include these unilateral movements in your training plan for stronger, better balanced running.

Coach Meredith