Tag Archives: running

4 Reasons to Love the Treadmill

Treadmill.  A running dirty word.  Affectionately known as the dreadmill, ask just about any runner and you’re sure to hear how much they loathe running on one.  They’re inside and they are boring.  Unfortunately treadmills get a bad wrap.  The gym staple can be both a valuable training tool and steady partner.  Here are four reasons Team ECRP (sometimes) loves their treadmills.

Safety.  Hopping on the old ‘mill can help keep you safe.  Running indoors can keep you away from potentially dangerous streets in busy or strange cities.  Especially during dark early mornings, late nights or slippery winter months having the ability to run indoors is great.  Sometimes it’s hard to beat a place where the temperature is controlled, the running surface is dry and the lights stay on.  The softer surface of a treadmill can also keep your body safe from injury.  Reduced pounding and a level belt will help protect tired tendons, ligaments, muscles and bones while staying out of the sun can help prevent skin cancer.

Weather.  There’s bad weather and then there’s bad weather.  Heading for cover every time it sprinkles or the wind picks up isn’t the best way to prep for race day but sometimes mother nature has other plans.  Hurricanes, blizzards and heat waves are all good reasons to stay inside and, maybe, away from windows.treadmill

Speed.  The last chunk of a hard workout is usually hard.  That’s the point, right?  If you really want to push yourself and work on maintaining a hard pace for longer, let the treadmill help you.  The belt won’t unintentionally slow down due to fatigue so as long as your feet keep moving, neither will you.  More time at a faster pace can contribute to faster race times and build confidence.

Hills.  Hill training can be tough for those who live in the flat lands.  Long, steady hills that are safe to run might be hard to find no matter where you are but usually a treadmill isn’t too far away.  Since incline is a feature on almost all ‘mills, put it to good use.  It’s easy to get in a killer hill session while working on both form and strength by pumping up that incline just a bit.

Coach Meredith

Running Strides: Why and When

A staple of any advanced training plan and a must do on any scholastic track or cross country team, strides are a wonderful tool.  Running strides has many benefits and missing out on them might leave speed on the table.  The good news is that running strides is both fun and good for you.  Here’s a guide on how to get the most from the strides you run.running strides

What are strides?
Strides are a short pick-up designed to focus on form.  Each one lasts for 15 to 30 seconds with about 1:40 recovery and reaches close to mile pace on flat ground.  Note that a stride is not a sprint!

Why run strides?
Running strides will improve your form.  It should be exaggerated and focused on during each pick-up with good posture and a relaxed body being paramount.  Strides also help develop muscle memory and encourage higher cadence which can mean increased speeds over the long haul.  These fast bursts at the end of a workout remind your legs that they have the ability to go fast when they’re a little tired.  That not only builds confidence but can help your become more fit.  Spending little bits of time at faster paces adds up to make a once seemingly way too fast race pace closer every time you hit it.

When should I run strides?
Running strides can mix up the middle of a longer run or close out an easy one.  Tossing some in the middle of a session is a great way to build fitness while having fun.  Try not to leave them for the very end of a workout or you might end up skipping them.  Additional times for strides include warming up for a race or before a tough workout.  Since they prepare your body to run fast and work hard using them is a must.

Meant to improve form, have some fun running fast and build fitness running strides is an invaluable and simple tool for everyone.  If you’re not comfortable adding strides to your next easy run, reach out to a qualified coach for help.

Coach Meredith

Running 101: The Right Running Shoes

Running shoes.  There are more styles, colors and types than most people know what to do with.  That doesn’t mean, however, they aren’t important.  The things you put on your feet when you head out the door for a run is ta crucial factor.  Shoes can make you faster, slow you down, protect your foot from debris and help stabilize an unsteady gait.  Making you feel pretty or more fun is usually an added bonus.  Here are a few kinds of footwear you might find while browsing and what each can do for you.

Training shoes.  This is a comfortable everyday shoe with a reasonable drop and amount of cushioning.  Covering 20 miles in these old friends should be no sweat.  You’ll spend the most time with these trusty companions so learn to love them.  There are tons of choices in this type of shoe so get fitted by a professional and make sure your feet are happy.running shoes

Racing Shoes.  New or returning athletes won’t initially need a pair of race specific running shoes.  This special pair of kicks is designed to help you go a bit faster on race day.  With lighter materials and less cushion they’re daintier than your training shoes.  The oftentimes lower drop in light shoes will make your entire leg stretch a little bit more with each step and the firmer build will make each muscle absorb a little more impact.  Those factors put additional stress on your body making them less than ideal for lots of training miles.

Tempo Shoes.  The above paragraph not withstanding, training in the shoe you’ll wear on race day is very important.  You risk a serious injury if you only train in cushioned shoes then go out to race a marathon in a racing shoe.  This lighter weight trainer is somewhere between your race shoe and training shoe, leaning towards the former.

A recovery shoe.  This cushy, comfy shoe is for the easy days.  Recovery running shoes are fluffy and have lots of padding.  They have a big drop to give your muscles a break from all the  stretching and contracting of a lower drop pair.  While the shoe won’t provide any extra benefit like a massage or compression it will give your legs a breather.

A trail shoe (or something else).  A special model designed for the roughness of unpaved, gravel and dirt surfaces not everyone needs a trail shoe.  Typically heavier with a thicker sole running shoes dedicated to trails are a good tool if you’re heading off road.  Additional options include spikes for cross country or track running, racing flats and any other special occasion footwear you can find.

Coach Meredith

4 Hip Strength Exercises for Runners

The muscles of your hips and glutes are the driving force behind running.  The stronger they are the more they will help you stay healthy and hit fast splits.  Mighty glutes are a must for harnessing your body’s power while stable hips mean good form through all your miles.  Use these four hip strength hip strengthexercises to get those muscle groups going and reap the rewards during your next race.

Side lying hip raise.  Begin by laying on your side.  Using your bottom shin and elbow as support, simultaneously raise your hip off the ground and top leg into the air.  Keep your shin bones parallel.  You’ll build all around hip strength with this exercise as both hips work through the entire movement.hip strength

Glute bridge/single leg.  This exercise strengthens your your glutes for more power.  Lying on your back, bend your knees so your heels are close to your butt.  Using your glutes push your hips into the air with a strong, stable core.  Stick one leg out for the single leg variation.

Clahip strengthm shells.  Fire up your glutes with this simple movement.  Laying on your side, stack your legs with bent knees.  Keep your feet together while you raise your top knee into the air like you’re opening a book ( or a clam shell).  Really squeeze the active glute and maintain a neutral spine with a strong core to get the most out of each rep.

Donkey kicks.  Donkey kicks are sure to fire up your glutes.  As your running powerhouse you can’t do enough to get them ready for a workout.  Starting on all fours, raise one leg behind you with the knee at 90 degrees until your hip is open.  Engage that side’s glute and use a pulsing contraction to active and strengthen your booty.  Be sure to keep your lower back still as you move by having a strong core and controlled breathing.

Donkey Still

While these exercises might look simple they can be tough in the beginning as your body learns new firing patterns and works muscles in new ways.  As with most strength programs start slowly.  You can always add a band or other form of resistance later!

Adding these exercises to your strength routine will help you become a more durable runner who can stay healthy for the long term.  For help with an appropriate strength program seek the guidance of an experienced coach and get stronger today!

Coach Meredith

Running Injuries: Why Did That Happen?

Runners get hurt all the time.  Whether it’s from doing too much without a day off, slipping on a rocky trail run or simply stubbing a toe, getting hurt happens.  Running injuries are more than common and bouncing back from one can be as simple as ice and elevation or as complicated as surgery and physical therapy.  In truth, however, they’re quite often very preventable.

Were you tackled in a football game?  That’s easy to source.  Do you have daily low back pain and discomfort?  Maybe your hamstrings are tight or weak.  Are you having knee pain because you over running injuriesstride while you run?  Foot pain from weak glutes?  Finding the source isn’t always easy but it’s always necessary.

That’s because simply taking time off until your injured body feels better isn’t the answer.  Without understanding where your injury came from you’re likely to go out and sooner or later go through the same thing again.  So what’s the solution?  Find and treat the source (poor mobility, bad form), not the symptom (pain, strained muscle).  Examples include foot problems from a lack of glute strength or knee pain from over striding.  The location of your injury isn’t where it presents because your body compensates to continue functioning.  These compensations can end up causing something even more serious.

To get to the root, ask yourself these questions:

What was I doing?
Are my movement patterns correct?
Do I have adequate mobility to perform these movements safely?
Am I using the correct equipment?
Do I take care of my body before and after a workout properly?
Am I over training?

Answering these questions will probably mean getting help from a coach, doctor or teacher who has the knowledge to guide you.  Get to the root cause, upstream or down, of your problem and kiss (most of) those running injuries goodbye.

Coach Meredith

3 Lunges Every Runner Needs

Runners need strength training.  It’s an important part of building speed and becoming resistant to injury.  That doesn’t, however, mean throwing a few random exercises together and having at it two or three days a week.  The key question for any strength work is ‘will this exercise make me better at my sport?’  With these three varieties of lunges the answer is an absolute ‘yes’.  All lunging exercises target the quads but these three specifically hit other muscle groups you need for powerful, stable and strong running.  Give each one a try and see how they can help you become a more powerful runner.lunges

Side Lunge – Also known as the lateral lunge this version strengthens your hips and glutes.  Especially those all important glute medius and minumus muscles.

Perform It:  Begin standing with your feet together, core engaged and good posture.  Then step one foot out straight to the side, bending the knee, pushing your hips back while maintaining an upright chesLungest while shifting weight to the foot that just stepped sideways.

Curtsy Lunge – You might not be getting ready to visit the queen but the curtsy lunge will help you prepare to run faster.  These lunges strengthen your hips and glutes by activating all three glute muscles, the maximus, medius and minimus.  The calf also gets some work in this exercise making it good for your whole leg.

Perform it:  Begin standing with both feet together.  Cross one leg behind the other while reaching sideways and back, just like a curtsy.  Remember to keep your chest up and your front knee above the ankle.

Lunges

Step Back Lunge – Also known as the reverse lunge this exercise fires up your quads just like the others but generates more hamstring and glute activation than a standard forward lunge.

Perform It: Standing with good, strong posture and feet together step one foot back on the toe while dropping that knee to the ground.  Maintain a flat back and the front knee behind the toe.  A small forward lean will help the glutes get a little more work but isn’t necessary.

It’s easy to add weight to any of these lunges by holding a kettlebell or dumbbell at your chest.  Get out there and start lunging today for a stronger running body!

Coach Meredith

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Reasons for Runners to Strength Train

All runners need to strength train.  That doesn’t mean taking up CrossFit or hitting the gym on a daily basis.  You can get all of the big benefits listed below from a simple, body weight program two to three days a week.  Read on to find out how starting to strength train will make you better athlete.

1. Stronger – There’s more in common between runners and lifters than meets the eye.  Just like runners need to practice running faster to have faster race times, lifters face the same challenge when they strength train.  This pattern of overloading muscles makes not only muscles but tendons, ligaments and joints work harder.  Working under reasonable loads as Box Jump 1simple as your own body weight means strong, durable muscles and joints that can take more intense training with ease.

2. Better Athlete – Strengthening your body has been shown to improve coordination.  That can translate into more efficient running form and faster race times.  Training tools such as agility ladder drills and plyometrics are an important part of the plan and build power.  Dynamic, quick weight lifting movements can also be beneficial to those looking to produce strength, power and coordination.

3.  Variety – Just like with running workouts you’ll want variety in your strength program.  This not only keeps it interesting but continues to challenge your body in new ways regularly.  Pushing your body to work in new and different ways, whether it’s a new exercise, more weight or higher repetitions is how your force it to adapt and improve. And who doesn’t want to be better?!  The good news is there are endless ways of combining exercises to get a good workout in.

4. Injury Prevention – Along with the durability you’ll gain from hitting the weight room you’ll become more resistant to injury.  Those stronger tendons, ligaments and muscles hold up under stress better than weaker ones.  In order to strength train properly most runners will have to also focus on improving their mobility and flexibility.  Increased ranges of motion make it easier for your body to work and can lead to decreased injury risk.  Another major benefit is that using unilateral (one side at a time) exercises can eliminate muscle imbalances.  Muscle imbalances often lead to injury or over use of one side.  We’re all born favoring one side but it doesn’t have to be that way forever.

5.  Speed – Muscles that lift weights become fatigue resistant.  That means you’ll use less energy to get somewhere in the same amount of time you did before.  Check out this study that demonstrates it.  Remember the strength, durability, power and coordination you built earlier?  They’ll work together to translate into faster race times.

Be sure that your strength program is designed for runners to prepare you for a stronger run rather than take away from it.  Seek the assistance of a qualified coach and start hitting the gym today!

Coach Meredith

Running 101: Racing Weight

Most runners have heard the phrase racing weight.  It’s a recognizable term that indicates your ideal weight for peak performance on race day.  Why does it matter?  For runners who are fit, exercise regularly and aren’t looking to shed any pounds what difference does it make?

In truth, it can make a big difference.  The addition of 5 pounds in body weight can result in a 5% detriment to race times and vice versa.  Leaning out or dropping a few pounds without sacrificing strength and power might lead to a slew of PRs.  There are also other advantages such as more efficient oxygen delivery to working muscles and improved heat dissipation.

Leaning out or losing a few pounds isn’t all about getting super skinny.  The goal is to improve power to weight ratios and become as efficient as possible.  That means muscle is incredibly important.  Having a balanced weight to power ratio makes you a faster runner.  Note that it’s racing weightunlikely, especially for women, that you’ll gain so much muscle mass it becomes detrimental to racing paces if you’re not specifically eating and training for it.  Strength training, plyometric work and hill repeats all make you a more robust runner without adding bulk.

And while being at a weight where you race your fastest and feel your best is rewarding, it’s not sustainable over long periods of time.  For recreational runners who race week in and week out or more often than once every six weeks an ultra lean, peak performance isn’t attainable at every turn.  Nor should it be.  Professional athletes push their bodies to the max with the help of coaches, dieticians, nutritionists and doctors to monitor every metric.

The diet and lifestyle required to hit a desired weight on race day isn’t easy.  It can involve strict dieting or food deprivation that aren’t the key to a healthy long term weight management plan for anyone.   The rest of us lack intense guidance from professionals and shouldn’t be taking big health risks.  Restricting fuel can lead to weak bones, softened immune systems and, for women, missed periods.   Sacrificing food for a lower number on the scale won’t help your body get stronger or faster.  Being properly fueled is a must if you want to perform well.

Remember, your weight can and should change throughout the day, week and year.  In the end, racing weight just happens to be where your body ends up when you’re peaking and shouldn’t be a predetermined number on a scale.

Coach Meredith

3 Reasons to Love Easy Run Days

It’s hard for runners to slow down.  There’s nothing more fun than running fast and knocking out a good, hard sweat session.  How would you get faster without them?  Unfortunately your body can’t handle strenuous workouts all the time without breaking down.  Alternating challenging workout days with easy run days, or even more than one between, is the structure of any solid training plan.  Here are three reasons Team ECRP loves their easy run days just as much as workout days.easy run

Build – You’ll build a foundation on easy run days.  This foundation is how your body adjusts to the stresses of distance running over time.  Easy running will help you earn stronger bones, tougher joints, improved running economy, develop slow twitch, fat burning muscles and increased aerobic capacity.

Relax – Easy days are low stress.  They’re for running with friends, checking out new routes or trails and forgetting the trials of the day.  You need fast workouts to improve turnover, create more mitochondria and increase VO2max but those sessions aren’t exactly relaxing or fun.  Easy days remind us why we love running.

Recovery –  Going fast is hard on your body.  After tough workouts it has to repair damaged muscle, expand blood vessels and learn to process more oxygen.  An easy workout helps clear out waste from muscles, improve circulation and might actually help speed muscle recovery.  If you push all the time those processes never get to finish their jobs and you’re inviting over training and burnout. Easy or recovery runs give your body a chance to make all of the positive performance enhancing adaptations it can.

The most important thing is to make sure your easy running is just that.  Easy.  Aim to be at least one minute slower than your goal race pace for the duration of an easy workout.  As your fitness level increases it can become hard to slow the pace down.  Keep the goal of each workout in mind and you’ll learn there’s no such thing as a ‘junk mile’.

Coach Meredith

4 Upper Body Exercises for Runners

Upper body strength is just as important for runners as lower body.  When those legs get tired something has to support continued movement and that’s going to be your upper body.  Having a strong back, powerful shoulders and a stable core will all help you run faster and with lower risk of injury.  Here are four of Team ECRP‘s favorite ways to earn them.  Each one will help you improve running form and stay strong over any distance you cover.

Banded Pull A-parts – This simple banded exercise strengthens your shoulders and upper back.  Strong shoulders lead to better posture and running form by setting the shoulders in an externally rotated position.  That means arms will travel forward and back without wasting any energy crossing the mid-line.

Push-ups – There are lots of variations for push-ups and they’re all good.  Starting with a basic push-up to strengthen your shoulders, chest and core you can use them as part of a warm-up or any strength workout.  Whether you modify them by dropping to your knees or maintain a plank position all the way through, push-ups will help train your shoulders to maintain good position when the going gets tough.

Renegade Rows – This key push-up version combines strength on both the anterior and posterior chains by adding a row.  Using a light dumbbell you’ll train for good posture and a strong core with this one.  Try to avoid round headed dumbbells, especially in the beginning, because they’ll want to roll and make you work a whole lot harder to stay in a good position.

Squat to Overhead Press – A fantastic combo move, the squat to overhead press works the whole body in one motion.  Building power, improving coordination and getting stronger all are benefits of this simple exercise.  Start with light weights and make sure you’re keeping your chest up without letting your knees fall in for 10 reps before stepping up to heavier dumbbells.

Add these four movements to your routine to build the stability and strength your upper body needs to carry you over every distance you cover with good form.

Coach Meredith