Tag Archives: running

Running Community: How to Give Back

The running community is amazing.  From elite athletes to first time 5k runners the support and enthusiasm is tangible everywhere.  While there are running events all year long, spring and fall are home to most of them.  Every weekend from March to November is packed with some kind of race.  After participating in a few, it’s nice to give back and help other runners have the great running communityexperiences you do.  Here are four of Team ECRP‘s favorite ways to give back to your local running community.

Volunteer – If incredible people stopped volunteering for running events, 95% of participants would be priced out and thousands of events would be canceled.  With a multitude of places to pitch in there’s sure to be a spot for you.  Consider a water stop, handing out medals or directing traffic.  Can’t make it on race day?  Help with packet pick-up or pre-race course set-up.

Organize – Put together your own race.  You’ll need some of the valuable volunteers mentioned above but if a cause is near and dear to you, support it!  Putting together an event can also be a great opportunity to meet others in your area.  Between sponsors, volunteers, t-shirt printers, timing crews and participants organizing a race will bring you into contact with tons of people who love running.  Who knows?  You might even find your next chance to give back.

Cheer – Happen to crash into a race during your long run or while exploring a new city?  Stop and cheer for a few minutes.  Spectators are the backbone of the running community and some people pick races based on how many will be out there.  It won’t cost you a thing and you might just be the one encouraging word that helps a someone hit a new PR.

Coach – There are lots of organizations that need volunteer coaches.  From your local track club to the national Girls on the Run there’s nothing more rewarding than helping children find something they love.  Even if one of the kids you work with isn’t the next Usain Bolt, the rewards you’ll reap are great.

What are your favorite ways to give back some of what the running community gives you?

Coach Meredith

 

Say ‘Yes’ to More Running Shoes

A closet isn’t any good unless it’s filled.  Filling one with running shoes is often inevitable for passionate runners.  Luckily there’s more than not being able to find the floor to owning multiple pairs of shoes dedicated to running.  Here are three of Team ECRP‘s top reasons to keep several worthy pairs at your disposal.

Different purposes.  The biggest reason you’ll want to have more than one pair of running running shoesshoes is that they don’t all perform the same job.  Some are built for racing on the track and others for the trail.  There are light shoes for racing and cushy ones for recovery.  Most runners train on a variety of surfaces and paces so it’s important to be prepared with the right gear for your workout.  Have a pair of dedicated shoes for each environment you’ll be tackling.

Models Change.  Constantly and not always for the better, in fact.  With shoe companies competing and technology changing there is always something different on the market.  Your current favorite shoe might not exist the next time you want t buy it and that can be disappointing.  Yes, you can grab 20 pairs of what you like each time you hit the store but they’ll wear out too.  Owning a variety of brands and models can protect you from that disappointment.running shoes

They age.  Just like everything else shoes get old and wear out.  Soles wear down and stop providing traction while insoles break down and can’t give support.  Old shoes are a recipe for injury and pain and throwing on a fresher pair can really open your eyes to needing some new ones.  You can check out this post to see if your current pair needs to be replaced.

While there are lots of other good reasons to add more running shoes to your collection these are the most important ones.  Having a choice model is every color?  That’s just a bonus.

Coach Meredith

Race Pace and Your Long Run

Training for a race is big commitment.  There are lots of miles and hours spent getting ready for the event and most of those miles are not spent at goal race pace.  Why not?  It’s too hard on your body to stay at race pace all the time.  Finding the balance between hard workouts and slower ones is important.  In fact, the majority of elite runners’ miles are spent at paces slower than their goal speed.  race pace

But you have to run fast to run fast!  Yes, and while any good training plan includes specific tempo workouts sometimes it’s nice to mix things up.  Luckily, your long run is a great place to add some faster miles.  Adding race pace running to your long run is a challenge that will get you both physically and mentally ready for a race day effort.  As your body adapts to spending time at goal pace, it’ll get easier.  It also provides a good chance to practice your fueling strategy.

One of Team ECRP‘s favorite long run with race pace miles workouts is the 3-2-1.  It can also be lengthened for marathon training to a 5-4-3-2-1 effort.  Run at least a mile warm-up then a mile easy between each section of race pace work.  The cool down is up to you.  This workout has you spending plenty of time getting comfortable at your goal pace without shredding your legs for the rest of the week.

A second option is to do a fast finish run.  Take the first two thirds of your run at normal long run pace then finish fast.  That can be at goal race pace or gradually faster all the way to the end.  Examples include a 20 miler with 10 miles at long run pace, 8 miles at race pace and a 2 mile cool down.  For a half marathon try a 13 miler with 8 miles at long run pace then 5 miles of getting 5-10 seconds faster per mile.

By breaking faster miles into sections you’ll be able to spend more time at goal pace with less wear and tear.  It will bring variety to the long run and help those workouts fly by.  Be careful not to include them too often, however.  These are challenging workouts and you’ll need time to recover.

Coach Meredith

Running 101: Marathon Recovery

Running a marathon is hard.  Racing one is even harder.  No matter how fast you cross the finish line your body will hurt, your mind will be tired and emotions will still be running high.  After your collect that medal and celebrate with all the carbs of any kind, it’s time to start letting your body heal.  How fast and how well you treat your beat up muscles post race makes a huge marathon recoverydifference in how quickly you can get back to your regular routine.  Use these tips for high quality marathon recovery and you’ll be back on track in no time.

Keep moving.  One of the most important aspects of marathon recovery is movement.  This doesn’t mean a tough track workout two days later or taking off for another race.  Giving muscles some easy work to do the day after racing has been shown to speed recovery but it has to be just that, easy.  A slow jog, air squats, a few push-ups and 30 minutes of yoga works wonders.  Your goal should be to keep blood, nutrition and oxygen pumping to damaged muscles without any added stress.

Mobilize.  Just getting out there are easy jogging a mile or two won’t get the job done.  You need to work tired and abused joints through a full range of motion to keep fluids moving around.  This is how you make sure muscles, tendons, ligaments and bones get the blood, oxygen and nutrients they need to repair while clearing out the debris from when they got damaged.  Foam rollers, bands, softballs and a lacrosse ball are all part of a well built marathon recovery kit.  A professional sports massage is also always a good idea.

Eat up.  You definitely burned a ton of calories covering all of those miles.  Replacing them and giving your body the nutrients it needs to repair damaged muscles is paramount.  Replenish fluids with sports drinks or salted water as soon as you cross the finish line.  When your tummy is ready, chow down on calorie loaded foods like bananas and yogurt.  After chilling out, putting your feet up for a bit and processing those foods, it’s time to head for pizza and tacos.marathon recovery

Sleep.  Getting an adequate amount of sleep will help you recover faster than just about anything else.  After the excitement of finishing and celebrating it can be tough to shut down.  When you get home try taking a warm bath, meditating and turning off all electronic devices.  Here’s a great piece on how a solid night’s shut eye can make a big difference in your marathon recovery.

Go easy on the celebration.  Yes, those free beers taste delicious but they’re just going to cause more trouble for your already hostile body.  Dehydrated muscles aren’t aching to lose more water.  Drink a bottle of water or sports drink before anything alcoholic then make sure you mix in plenty of other fluids with those post race cocktails.  A long walk or standing around for a little bit won’t do any harm but staying for the entire post race convert might.  You want to get off your feet for a few hours as soon as you can to start the healing process.

Freeze.  Cryotherapy and ice baths are wonderful tools to jump start marathon recovery.  Part of many runners’ regular plan cold therapies are effective and simple.  Lowering your temperature flushes waste from muscles, reducing swelling and lets them get down to business right away.  Have an ocean or lake near by?  Celebrate by jumping in!

Coach Meredith

Racing 101: Get Marathon Day Ready

Running a marathon is tough.  Racing one is even harder.  Whichever path you chose to cover 26.2+ miles you need to be prepared for the long journey.  Getting marathon day ready is more than simply logging those training workouts.  Making sure you’re prepared for race day is an important part of any well rounded training plan.  Here are four things every Team ECRP knows before they toe the line at their marathon.marathon day

Test Nutrition.  Everyone has to have something to eat or drink while on the marathon course.  While most of us won’t get designated bottles we can still control what goes into our bodies.  Find out what they’ll have on course for hydration and fuel then practice with it.  It might work for you and it might not but marathon day is not when you what to find that out.

Train in Bad Weather.  Not only does training when the weather’s crummy, not dangerous, make you a bad ass, it prepares you for the unknown you’ll face on race day.  It’s tough to get out there when it’s cold or raining but it’s also very important.  Determine what conditions you could face on marathon day and train in them.  Run in the cold, rain and snow and your finish time will thank you.

Wear Your Gear.  We all have favorite pieces of gear.  That pair of lucky underwear or special pair of bright race day shoes is a must for marathon day.  Those pieces are likely well broken in but that doesn’t mean our socks, hats and sports bras are.  Never wear anything new on race day especially holds true when you’re covering 26+ miles so make sure whatever you’re going to put on has been worn on at least one or two long runs during training.

Plan for Logistics.  Marathon day can be a nightmare even if the start is right outside your front door.  There’s traffic, stressed out runners, confused spectators and that guy with a dog on too long a leash.  Know where you’ll park, where the start and finish are and where you’ll meet your support afterwards.  Having a plan will eliminate race morning stress and help you perform the best you can out on the course.

Use these tips to create a plan that works for you and you’ll ace any marathon day test you face.

Coach Meredith

3 Reasons to Plank Every Day

It sounds boring.  Perform a plank every single day.  There’s good reason to, however, especially for runners.  With endless options for the type of plank you choose to do there’s bound to be a few you can pick from.  No matter which ones you end up practicing you’ll get these three benefits and become a stronger runner.

Strength.  Planks increase core strength and stability while activating lots of other supporting muscles as well.  Regular plank works your entire frontal plane, from your chest to your quads.  Reverse it to hit shoulders and glutes along with those all important core muscles.  You can even add other movements to your planking.  Try a renegade row or windshield wiper for a planktougher challenge that will build strength through your whole running body.

Balance.  Performing unilateral varieties like side planks will help eliminate muscle imbalances  that can, eventually, lead to injury.  Less risk of injury is a big benefit of all strength training but especially of one side at a time work.  We all have a tendency to favor one side that becomes more and more dominant as we ignore it.  Making both sides pitch in leads to more power and more even impact during activity.

Better running.  With the strength and balance you’re building by tackling that plank each day your running form will improve.  You’ll have better posture with an upper body and core that can support faster running for a longer period of time.  Proper positioning also stretches the muscles of your foot, an area that often gets overlooked.  Fully functioning feet are an important part of quality running and planks can help.  Add those benefits together and it all means better race finishes.

Tip:  Create a set of flash cards each featuring a different variety with the type on one side and your times or reps on the other to record progress.

Coach Meredith

Are You Too Sick to Run?

Can I run?  Should I run?  Wondering if you’re too sick to run is a common questions for runners.  This is a tough question to answer.  Everyone reacts to feeling badly differently and we all recover at different speeds.  What one person can do with a slight head cold might not work for another.  Here are a few tips to help you determine if you should hit that session or stay inside.too sick to run

Weather.  Take into account the weather.  Bad weather isn’t going to help you get well.  Heading out into cold, windy or wet conditions when you’re feeling crummy isn’t a good idea.  Working out can put a lot of stress on your body so don’t make it even tougher but adding adverse outdoor conditions.  Have an indoor or cross training session instead of braving the elements if possible and don’t worry about one or two missed workouts.  You’re better off being healthy!

Move Around.  Sometimes getting up and moving around can help you feel better all on its own.  Increasing circulation and putting muscles to work will kick your body into repair mode.  We tend to be idle when we aren’t 100% and that can make things worse.  If it feels more like lack of motivation than actual sickness, get up and move.

The Neck Rule.  If your symptoms are above your neck, say a runny nose and mild headache, you’re good to go.  When symptoms present below your neck, such as coughing or weakness, you should probably skip out.  The single exception to this rule is a fever.  If your temperature is climbing, stay put and enjoy some chicken soup with a movie.

Activity Level.  Many tapering marathoners catch colds.  Their bodies are so used to repairing and fighting during months of training that when they take a breather the immune system goes bonkers.  You’re probably not too sick to run if that’s your situation.  You won’t be doing any incredibly challenging workouts anyway, so enjoy those few light weeks even if you’re not 100%.

Coach Meredith

3 Reasons You Need a Running Buddy

Training is hard work.  There are tons of factors that play a role in getting you to the starting line without any serious bumps in the road.  One of the most important, however, is staying motivated and on track with workouts and recovery.  The best way to do this?  A running buddy!

A running buddy is more than just someone to complain with then the weather is bad or celebrate with when you hit that freshly earned PR.  Here are three of Team ECRPs favorite reasons to gather up all of your running friends and hit a workout together.running buddy

Better workouts.  Whether you’re on the track with your running buddy or a stranger, having some competition will help you push yourself a little bit more.  Like going out with the fast crowd at the start of a race, we all want to be in the front.  If your buddy is a faster runner, they might pace you for a speed session where you’re more likely to work harder and stay consistent.  If your buddy isn’t quite as quick as you, let them help you take it easy on a recovery day.

Socialize.  There’s nothing as tasty as those post race beers.  It’s even better when you have your training partner to celebrate with after you cross the finish.  A running buddy can introduce you to tons of people.  A running network is a great way to find your next race, explore new places to run or discover a perfect new piece of gear.

Accountability.  It rains.  It snows.  Outside can be cold or hot or windy.  On those tough days when you’re lacking motivation or the weather’s bad, your running buddy is there.  You’re going to show up when you know someone is waiting for you.  The suffering you endure together creates toughness you’ll need on race day.  It makes memories and can help you see the bright side of a not-so-good workout.

The really good news is that you can have as many running buddies as you want.  That’s one of the benefits of joining your local running group.  You’ll find a friend for any distance or any speed and rock your workout together.

Coach Meredith

 

3 Keys to Winter Training

Winter training is hard.  It’s dark, cold, windy, snowy or worse.  Unfortunately, working out during the bleak winter months is a must if you’re aiming for a spring race.  On the flip side, it winter trainingcan be fun to experiment and explore new avenues for staying on track with your training.  Here are three ways Team ECRP stays on track to rock their spring races.

Mix it up.  Try new things.  Crappy weather outside can force you indoors for workouts.  That doesn’t always mean the treadmill.  Try a spin class or going for a swim.  You can easily replace some of your easy aerobic runs with another activity that requires an equal effort without risking feeling like you’ve missed out.  You might even find something you really enjoy and want to stick with when the weather warms up.

Find a friend.  Or five or fifty or more.  Joining a training team or local running group can help you accomplish things you might not have ever imagined.  Running with a group can provide you with that accountability that helps you drag yourself out of bed on those dark, bone chilling (until you’ve warmed up) mornings.  A group can also help block wind while bringing laughter and memories that will keep you warm for a lifetime.

Be prepared.  Have a plan in place to deal with bad weather days.  Make sure you warm up before you head outdoors and have a dry set of clothes waiting for your return.  Most importantly, prepare your mind.  Be flexible with your winter training plan, unafraid to switch workouts to different days or perform a substitute activity.  Be sure to listen to your body but realize that pushing through a yucky run or two will only make you more prepared for race day.  You never know what you’ll face at the starting line.

Use these tips to power through your winter training and be ready when the weather’s nice to hit any goal you set.

Coach Meredith

 

Speed Work: Walking or Jogging Rest?

The only way we get faster is by actually running faster.  While we can’t push ourselves all the time without inviting injury, working hard is the only way we get better.  The best way to practice running faster is with interval work.  Bursts of speed with a period of standing, walking or jogging rest between repetitions.

So which kind of rest is best for you?  Jogging or walking?  The choice you end up making can play a major role in how intense your workout ends up being.  Varying the type of rest you use during a workout can also be a good gauge of how your fitness is improving.  Did you walk for rest the first few times but now jogging rest is feeling good?  As long as the work portions are jogging restthe same pace and effort, you’re clearly increasing your fitness.

Jogging Rest
While you might want to stop and stand to catch your breath, jogging rest has big benefits.  Continuing to move will help clear lactic acid and waste in muscles, keeping your body ready to work for the next repetition and workout intensity high.  Lactate levels drop the most when recovery lasts more then 90 seconds.  This length of rest is usually associated with repetitions lasting three to five minutes or longer.

Walking Rest
Slow walking has its own set of benefits.  It allows for body to recover by clearing lactic acid and muscle waste without the extra stress of having to continue working.  This is the most used and probably best choice for most basic workouts.

Standing Rest
Standing rest doesn’t keep your blood moving very much.  Bent over, panting, hands on knees standing means you’ll face a build up of lactic acid and muscle waste during your next repetition.  That makes legs feel heavy and worn out, simulating that tired feeling at the end of a race without having to rack up all the miles beforehand.  On the other hand, your supply of power creating phosphocreatine refills when you’re standing.  This type of rest is best used when you’re working on top speed.  Repeats less than 90 seconds mean you’re burning through that phosphocreatine and need to let it refresh before taking off again.

Of course, standing, walking and easy jogging rest aren’t your only options.  You can use marathon pace to recover from 10k pace intervals.  Not recovering fully between intervals will help you get tougher for race day and become more comfortable being uncomfortable.

When in doubt about what type of rest is best to get the most our of your speed session, seek the advice of a professional.  A coach can help you design the right kind of workouts to reach your goals without risking injury or overtraining.

Coach Meredith